Torque continues turning rigs at New Dawn

Torque Metals (ASX:TOR) is continuing to advance exploration at its New Dawn Lithium Project in Western Australia, upon intersecting thick, continuous pegmatite lodes with spodumene. 

The $30.61 million market capitalisation company’s diamond drilling program is aiming to investigate ‘high-grade’ spodumene areas in hopes of providing ‘crucial’ insights into lode continuity, geometry, structure, and mineralisation. 

Managing Director Cristian Moreno says Torque’s focus remains on advancing exploration at New Dawn, while upholding disciplined capital allocation. 

“I am eager to keep the market updated on our progress as we continue to demonstrate the potential of both New Dawn and the adjacent Paris Gold Project.”

The ongoing diamond drilling will also include collecting samples for metallurgical testwork, which will be carried out by Independent Metallurgical Operations. 

Further, Moreno says Torque recently completed a reverse circulation (RC) drill campaign, and as a result, every hole delivered consistently encountering vertically stacked pegmatites. 

“Further validation comes from the indication of spodumene via Raman analysis and UV light examination. We eagerly await the assay results expected in early March, which will offer crucial insights into lithium grades and potential mineral extensions.

With 17 RC holes awaiting assay results and ongoing diamond drilling, we anticipate announcing positive outcomes later this quarter. We have every confidence the results will validate our geological model.”

Torque completed a 5,000m RC drill campaign aiming to test and extend the company’s maiden exploration target. Thick, continuous pegmatite lodes were intersected with spodumene confirmed by Raman analysis and indicated under UV light remaining open in all directions.

Torque says Raman spectroscopy stands as an analytical method of discerning the intricate molecular architectures and chemical contexts present within organic and inorganic molecules, alongside molecular ions. Through this technique, valuable information regarding molecular structures and their surrounding chemical environments is elucidated, enabling deeper insights into their physical properties.

Raman spectroscopy provides vibrational fingerprints of chemical compounds, enabling their identification via a comparison with reference spectra. Torque notes the assignment of Raman spectra to minerals and, more generally, inorganic phases, is straightforward and unambiguous, if appropriate reference data is accessible.

Meanwhile, Torque has acquired camp facilities at Widgiemooltha in Western Australia, to accommodate up to 18 people. This is expected to provide numerous cost savings and time efficiencies for Torque. 

Torque Metals is an Australian mineral explorer focused on its Penzance exploration camp that covers a 800km-square area and includes 12 wholly owned mining, 4 prospecting, and 26 exploration licences. 

In the New Dawn area multiple pegmatite bodies, primarily found in biotite quartzite and quartz feldspar biotite schist meta-sediments, have been identified. The country rock consists mainly of mafic schist, with chlorite and biotite quartzites likely originating from fine-grained arenaceous and argillaceous sediments. 

Additionally, a quartz-feldspar porphyry dyke forms a low strike ridge along the western boundary of M15/217, with scattered outcrops of feldspar porphyry near the eastern boundary. These pegmatites exhibit massive characteristics, effectively penetrating the host rock as vertically stacked pegmatites. 

As of 31 December 2023, the company had $2.829 million cash and cash equivalents at hand, according to its latest quarterly report.

Write to Aaliyah Rogan at Mining.com.au  

Images: Torque Metals 
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Written By Aaliyah Rogan
Relocated from the East Coast in New Zealand to Queensland Australia, Aaliyah is a fervent journalist who has a passion for storytelling. When Aaliyah isn’t writing stories, she is either spending time with friends and family or down at the beach.